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[Here We Go Again] Houston Flooding

Discussion in 'BBS Hangout: Debate & Discussion' started by MystikArkitect, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    This water was all from inside the city, not squat in Addicks or Barker, it just came at a rate that exceeded all design parameters for the internal drainage system. Beyond what is possible really. 75 years ago you could have cut the major bayous 1000 feet wide but you couldn't do that now.
     
  2. biff17

    biff17 Member

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    Not used to having days off like this at the beginning of the year but I'll take it.
     
  3. dmoneybangbang

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    I’ll take your word for it but I’m more talking about in general. Having a better system of reservoirs to prevent upstream water from reaching houston during torrential downpours is prudent.
     
  4. Sajan

    Sajan Member

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    Ya..after Harvey, I lost any desire to buy a home in Houston. I am not getting stuck with a mortgage here. No thanks. I need to be able to move quickly.

    The people here seems to be content with how things are. No desire to change or adapt. No solid public transportation, no plans to preserve or expand green spaces..just more parking lots after parking lots.

    At this point I am willing take on a more harsh winter than the brutal summers and humidity year around.

    The only thing that keeps me here is my job. Great pay for what I do.
     
    ThatBoyNick, Hakeemtheking and J.R. like this.
  5. rocketsjudoka

    rocketsjudoka Contributing Member

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    Yep 500 years ain’t what it used to be. This is the new norm. It’s not just climate change but Too much impervious paving, outdated infrastructure unable to keep up with growth, and on top of that Houston is sinking.
     
    No Worries likes this.
  6. Buck Turgidson

    Buck Turgidson Mineshaft Enthusiast
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    Define "inside the city" now versus, say 20 years ago? What's the difference in impervious groundcover then vs now?
     
  7. SamFisher

    SamFisher Contributing Member

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    https://www.cbsnews.com/live-news/global-climate-change-strike-today-2019-09-20-live-updates/

    Kids are now more realistic about climate, guns, and other issues than a substantial proportion of grown-ups.

    Grown-ups need to grow the **** up.
     
    conquistador#11 and No Worries like this.
  8. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    By 'in the city' I meant there wasn't significant runoff coming from the bayous that source West of town. The reservoirs are virtually empty. The Houston streets did exactly what they are designed to do (as if there were any other options), they collected runoff, pooled it, and drained into the bayous at the design rate. The flooding problems come when the rainfall rates exceed the design rates.

    As with any engineering problem you look for the cost/benefits of the parameters you choose.to design for to get the most bang for the buck or just feasibly possible within budget restraints. And remember we are talking tax dollars here that no one wants to pay.

    But every time you tear down a 2000 sq. ft. house on a quarter acre lot and put up a 3,000 sq. ft. house you increase the impervious cover. Everytime you take a four lane road and widen it into a 6 lane road, you increase the impervious cover, or, convert a 11 lane freeway into a 21 lane freeway... for miles and miles. Rainwater that might have soaked into the ground or slowly seeped to the drainage ways now runs over low drag paved surfaces racing into the streets and pipes and bayous. It renders the original design assumptions obsolete, and makes outlier events like yesterday ever more dramatic.
     
  9. Sajan

    Sajan Member

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    Yup. Just look at the 10+ miles of concrete that's being added for the toll lanes.
     
  10. likestohypeguy

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    Let's keep digging more holes and pouring more concrete... I think this strategy will eventually succeed, in the long run.
     
    Sajan likes this.
  11. B-Bob

    B-Bob my celli weighs a ton
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    Every time I see this thread, I hear Flavor Flav:
    "Here we go again! Back to the roof. Back to the roof!" Anyone else?

     
  12. Dubious

    Dubious Contributing Member

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    In Houston when you dig a hole you just hit the ground water. And a bayou is a bayou and not a creek or river because there is not enough elevation change to sea level for the water to flow much.

    There are not going to be any 'solutions'. We just need to learn to stay off the roads in a tropical event, and buy flood insurance.
     
    Sajan likes this.
  13. DaDakota

    DaDakota Contributing Member

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    Vote for Democrats they believe Scientists are right and we need to reverse this...

    DD
     
    CometsWin and LosPollosHermanos like this.
  14. body slam

    body slam Member

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    Has anything been done in Houston to deal with flooding since Harvey?
     
  15. JuanValdez

    JuanValdez Contributing Member

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    Yes. The county got their ass in gear to execute on some bayou and retention pond projects that have been in the works.
     
    body slam likes this.
  16. Mr.Scarface

    Mr.Scarface Member

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    No bayou or retention pond is going to have 20+ inches of rain in a 24-48 hour period, let alone 35-40 inches some on the east side got. The storms are getting worse. That is the problem.
     
  17. txtony

    txtony Member

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    Right. These five 500 yr rain events over the last 5 years for this general area is about the amount of rain, not what’s on the ground. Of course the ground play a part but it wouldn’t be anywhere the issue without regular 500 yr rain events.
     
  18. pirc1

    pirc1 Contributing Member

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    No need to worry about any of this, it will be gone in a year or two, as all of this is just a giant Chinese hoax. Don't believe me? Just ask our president.
     
    CometsWin likes this.
  19. Invisible Fan

    Invisible Fan Insider Newsletter™ 2X Diamond Member

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    I've been hoping some mad scientist would have a plan to dig tunnels for miles into the aquifers up north
     
  20. No Worries

    No Worries Contributing Member

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    This is an engineering problem which can be solved. Drainage for Harris can be designed to take 60" of rain in a 24 hour period (a la Harvey).

    Multiple, large high capacity drainage ditches can be dug.

    This will be expensive.

    People will be forced to moved out of their homes. Businesses will also be forced to moved.
     
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